What Are the Dangers of Mixing Molly and Alcohol?

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Young people have embraced the drug MDMA, commonly known as “molly”, and often combine it with alcohol. Both substances have their own risks, but the dangers of mixing molly and alcohol may not be known to those who use them together. If you or someone you love is mixing molly and alcohol, it’s important to understand how potent this combination can be. 

What Is Molly? 

The scientific name for molly is methylenedioxymethamphetamine, also known as MDMA. Molly is a stimulant type of drug that often causes hallucinogenic effects. Similar to what happens with other street drugs, drug manufacturers may mix in other narcotics or non-drug items when they make molly. This increases the likelihood of someone becoming ill or consuming impurities they are not aware are included in the drug. 

Molly comes in a powder that is most commonly consumed in pill form, although some snort it or mix it into a drink. Molly’s effects typically last between three to six hours, although many people take more than one dosage over the course of several hours, increasing the time it takes before they come down.

Molly is often referred to by slang or street names, which can make it difficult for parents and other loved ones to know what someone they care about is referencing or using. Some of the other names for molly include:

  • Adam
  • Beans
  • Disco biscuits
  • E or Vitamin E
  • E-bomb
  • Ecstasy
  • Happy pill
  • Hug drug
  • Love drug
  • Scooby snacks
  • Skittles
  • X, XTC, or Vitamin X

Molly Is Popular Among Young Adults and Teenagers

Molly first gained popularity in the rave scene. Young adults and teenagers would attend raves, which are large dance parties often held in warehouses or other non-commercial spaces. Raves are known to last through the entire night. Molly became known as a way to enjoy a boost of energy that allowed users to stay up late and dance for extended periods of time. 

Because of the hallucinogen effect, molly provides, those who ingested it found the colors of the lights at raves and other parties to be particularly intense, as well as the music being played. Many users felt it was similar to using acid but with fewer effects and less risk of ending up having a negative experience. Unfortunately, molly has its own risks, including the dangers of mixing molly and alcohol.

Short Term Effects of Using Molly 

MDMA usage has short-term effects on the brain because it increases the activity of three specific brain chemicals: 

  • Dopamine: Molly increases a person’s energy level and causes elevated levels of happiness
  • Serotonin: Molly boosts a person’s mood and causes a rise in their level of sexual arousal. Users often feel bursts of emotional intimacy and an ability to trust those around them. Increased serotonin levels also affect a person’s appetite and sleep. 
  • Norepinephrine: Molly increases a person’s heart rate and blood pressure, which can become even more dangerous if they are exerting themselves through dancing and other physical activities. 

Other short-term side effects from using molly can include nausea, blurred vision, sweating, muscle cramps, and chills. For days after usage, a person may feel irritable, aggressive, or depressed. They may experience difficulty sleeping, memory problems, and a decreased appetite for food and sex. 

Long Term Effects: The Dangers of Mixing Molly and Alcohol

While MDMA causes an increase in a person’s positive moods, because alcohol is a depressant, it provides the opposite effect. Alcohol clouds a person’s judgment and ability to reason, which can make them more likely to engage in poor impulse control. Because molly also affects impulse control, the dangers of mixing molly and alcohol increase the likelihood that a person will engage in extreme physical activity. They are also more likely to act in risky ways, such as driving while intoxicated or having unprotected sex. 

Both molly and alcohol usage can elevate a person’s blood pressure and heart rate. Using the two substances together greatly increases the risk of this happening.  A person who already has blood pressure or heart-related physical ailments may not be cognizant that doing something like dancing for long periods of time can cause a dire medical reaction in their body. Over time, the heart and blood pressure can develop long-term damage.  

People often binge drink while taking molly, which provides its own set of risks. Binge drinking is defined as consuming four to five alcoholic drinks in about two hours. Individuals who binge drink and take molly experience an increased risk of long-term physical and mental health ailments, including:

  • Raised blood pressure
  • Increased heart rate
  • Shallow or labored breathing
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Confusion

Another one of the dangers of mixing molly and alcohol involves the liver. The liver metabolizes both substances, and having a large amount of alcohol in a person’s system can slow the liver’s ability to remove molly from the body, which can cause a dangerous buildup. When too much molly remains in the system, a person may experience stronger side effects each time they use the drug again. 

What to Do if You Think Someone Is Abusing Molly

Because of the dangers of mixing molly and alcohol, a person who becomes addicted to these substances requires professional treatment. Talking to the person can let them know that they are exposing themselves to both physical and mental health risks, and you can assist them in getting help. Because younger people often do not understand how dangerous combining substances can be, explain to them the reality of their situation. 

Launch Centers specializes in treating young people who have become lost in the world of drugs and alcohol. We can provide treatment for someone who abuses molly and alcohol and helps them get back on a healthy track in their lives.

Treatment for Molly and Alcohol Abuse in Los Angeles

Many people who deal with an addiction to drugs or alcohol end up abusing more than one substance. If you or someone you love is mixing molly and alcohol, or any other type of dangerous substances, we can help turn your life around. Our program treats multiple addictions in young adults, along with any co-occurring mental health issues. Contact Launch Center today to get started on a new life of recovery.

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